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Maha Shakir
PO Box 4783 Abu Dhabi, UAE
Phone: 971-2-599-3693
E-mail: Maha.Shakir@zu.ac.ae
mahashakir@gmail.com
Dr Maha is an Assistant Professor of Information Systems at Zayed University, UAE. Her primary research areas are information system strategy, strategic management of information systems, and the implementation of enterprise system applications (e.g., ERP, SCM, and CRM). Her current work involves studies of enterprise systems in the Arab Gulf Countries, e-procurement in the petroleum industry in the Middle East, and Arab women adoption of IT. Her publications appeared in MIS Quarterly Executive, University of Auckland Business Review, Journal of Cases on Information Technology, International Journal of Information Systems and Change Management, Journal of Decision Systems, ERP edited books, Laudon & Laudon MIS textbook, and several international IS conferences.

Journal articles

2007
Maha Shakir, Graham R Smith, Erkan Gulec (2007)  E-Procurement : Reaching out to small and medium businesses   MIS Quarterly Executive 6: 4. 225-238  
Abstract: A main inhibitor to electronically extending supply chains is that large organizations and the majority of their smaller business partners have incompatible business systems. Big businesses' sophisticated IT infrastructures support many kinds of information integration, manipulation, and reporting, whereas many small to medium businesses (SMBs) use IT only for simple clerical tasks. Big businesses will not be able to fully exploit their huge investments in internal integration capabilities until they can extend IT integration capabilities to the majority of their supply-chain partners. The case study in this article describes how Petroleum Development Oman (PDO), a large oil and gas exploration and production company, electronically integrated its complete vendor base through e-procurement. The key to success was outsourcing both the delivery of the e-procurement solution and vendor-relationship management to a third party. This approach avoided the need for huge upfront investment and provided support for vendors from day one. PDO's experience shows that relatively IT-immature SMBs can successfully adopt e-procurement in a reasonably short time. The four main lessons from this case are: (1) address vendors' negative perceptions of competitive bidding, (2) share the benefits with vendors, (3) make the system simple, easily accessible, and familiar, and (4) overcome public infrastructure constraints by focusing on service and substituting one technology with another.
Notes:
2006
Maha Shakir, Dennis Viehland (2006)  Understanding Technochange in ERP Implementation through two case studies : Special Issue on Managing Process of Change and ERP Systems   International Journal of Information Systems and Change Management 1: 3. 262-284  
Abstract: This study provides an understanding of the organisational change that accompanies enterprise resource planning (ERP) system implementations. While there is general agreement in the literature that organisational change through IT integration â technochange â is a key outcome to any ERP implementation, there is little evidence on how this change happens. Using two case studies of ERP implementations, we report two variations on the change process. The first is a thoroughly planned and quickly executed implementation that aims to achieve radical change outcomes. In the second case, change is unintended and emerges slowly and gradually as a consequence of implementation progress. An analysis of technochange process variables provides the framework for the cross-study comparison. This study's key findings suggest that thoroughly planned ERP implementations score high on outcome success measures while implementations fostering gradual change pay attention to process success measures.
Notes:
Ken Ryba, Tom McIvor, Maha Shakir, Di Paez (2006)  Liberated learning : Analysis of university students' perceptions and experiences with continuous automated speech recognition   e-Journal of Instructional Science and Technology 8: 1. 1-23  
Abstract: This study examined continuous automated speech recognition in the university lecture theatre. The participants were both native speakers of English (L1) and English as a second language students (L2) enrolled in an information systems course (Total N=160). After an initial training period, an L2 lecturer in information systems delivered three 2-hour lectures over a three-week period to the participants and other students. Student self reports indicated that there were a number of perceived benefits associated with the use of continuous automated speech recognition. Compared with L1 students, a significantly greater number of L2 students and special needs students reported that the system had potential as an instructional support mechanism. However, a greater accuracy in the systemâs recognition of lecture text vocabulary needs to be achieved. The implications are that lecturers need an extensive training period before delivering lectures using continuous automated speech recognition.
Notes:
2005
Dennis Viehland, Maha Shakir (2005)  Making sense of enterprise systems implementation   University of Auckland Business Review 7: 2. 27-36  
Abstract: Enterprise systems implementation choices are some of the most critical IT decisions an organisation encounters. In New Zealand organisations, is this an anarchical or political xD;process, as sometimes portrayed in the media?
Notes:
Maha Shakir, Dennis Viehland (2005)  The Selection of the IT Platform : Enterprise System Implementation in the NZ Health Board   Journal of Cases on Information Technology 7: 1. 22-33  
Abstract: The Health Board is one of the largest public health care providers in New Zealand (NZ). In early 1999, a supply chain optimization review recommended an enterprise system (ES) implementation to provide better control and reporting of organizational finances. The focus of this case is the IT platform decision made in conjunction with the ES implementation process. This decision was thoroughly considered by all Health Board stakeholders and the final choice was made in alignment with the Board's strategic IT policy. Nevertheless, initial testing two months prior to go-live revealed major performance problems with the new system. The case documents the events that led up to the selection of the original IT platform and the challenges the project team faced in deciding what to do when the platform did not meet contractual specifications.
Notes:
2002
Maha Shakir (2002)  Book Review : Technology Acquisition: Buying the Future of Your Business   ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes 27: 2. 73-74  
Abstract:
Notes: Technology Acquisition: Buying the Future of Your Business is written by Allen Eskelin, and published by Addison-Wesley, 2001 (paperback), ISBN: 020173804X, 208 pp., $29.99.
2001
Liaquat Hossain, Maha Shakir (2001)  Stakeholder Involvement Framework for Understanding the Decision Making Process of ERP Selection   Journal of Decision Systems : Special Issue on ERP and its Impact on Decision Making 10: 1. 11-27  
Abstract: This study provides the first detailed analysis of stakeholder involvement for the decision making process of enterprise resource planning (ERP) selection in New Zealand. A stakeholder involvement framework (SIF) is developed to understand the role of stakeholders in the decision making process of ERP selection using a multiple case study design approach. Findings suggest that external stakeholders as well as internal stakeholders are equally involved in the selection of ERP systems, however the level of involvement along the timeline of the ERP project changes. We conclude that the proposed SIF for ERP selection may guide companies in effective management of their implementation and post-implementation phase of ERP systems.
Notes: Addition to the ERP EndNote library

Book chapters

2008
Maha Shakir (2008)  ERP Trends, Opportunities, & Challenges : A focus on the Gulf Region in the Middle East   In: Enterprise Resource Planning for Global Economies: Managerial Issues and Challenges Edited by:Carlos Ferran, Ricardo Salim. 301-319 IGI Global  
Abstract: This chapter highlights the key trends in the ERP market, with a focus on the challenges related to the implementation of these systems in the Middle Eastern Gulf region. The key trends discussed here include consolidation of the ERP market, diversification of the ERP product, new modes for ERP application delivery, ERP and new technologies, changing ERP pricing structures, ERP support operations, growing demands for ERP vertical solutions, demanding ERP customers, inter-organizational ERP solutions, and regional adaptations for ERP products. The chapter further provides insight into emerging and future trends in the region. Awareness of these issues plus knowledge of the local environment gives us a richer understanding of key ERP issues and how they apply within the unique limitations and opportunities of this region.
Notes:
2007
Maha Shakir, Guy Higgins (2007)  Opportunities in Business to Business Systems   In: Global Text Project: Information Systems Edited by:Rick Watson.  
Abstract: Information systems provide many opportunities for businesses to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their operations through the integration of business systems. While the majority of information systems in the past were focused on applications within the boundaries of the enterprise, the focus is gradually shifting outwards. Businessto- business (B2B) systems are a part of those systems that are applied to relationships outside of the boundaries of the enterprise. Ongoing innovations in web technologies are making the integration of business systems across companies (i.e., outside the boundaries of an individual company but forming its supply chain) technically possible and financially feasible. Managing the B2B aspects of these supply chain relationships is creating substantial opportunities, both in the streamlining of operations and in the development of new and innovative business delivery mechanisms. These opportunities are the focus of this chapter. This chapter explores the importance of system integration (both internally and across the supply chain), provides a brief history of B2B systems, introduces the types of information technologies enabling these systems, and identifies the challenges to their adoption. New business models that are enabled utilizing these technologies are also discussed.
Notes:
2006
Maha Shakir, Dennis Viehland (2006)  Case study one : The selection of the IT platform: Enterprise system implementation in the NZ Health Board   In: Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm Edited by:Kenneth C Laudon, Jane P Laudon. Prentice Hall  
Abstract: The Health Board is one of the largest public health care providers in New Zealand (NZ). In early 1999, a supply chain optimization review recommended an enterprise system (ES) implementation to provide better control and reporting of organizational finances. The focus of this case is the IT platform decision made in conjunction with the ES implementation process. This decision was thoroughly considered by all Health Board stakeholders and the final choice was made in alignment with the Board's strategic IT policy. Nevertheless, initial testing two months prior to go-live revealed major performance problems with the new system. The case documents the events that led up to the selection of the original IT platform and the challenges the project team faced in deciding what to do when the platform did not meet contractual specifications.
Notes:
2002
Maha Shakir, Liaquat Hossain (2002)  A Study of the ERP Selection Process in New Zealand   In: Enterprise Resource Planning: Solutions and Management Edited by:Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah. 221-242 IRM Press  
Abstract: This study provides an exploratory investigation of the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software selection process in New Zealand. A brief background together with the main features of ERP is provided. It is conferred in this study that the selection and implementation of ERP deserves equal importance. Findings of exploratory case studies on the ERP selection process in New Zealand (NZ) suggest that the selection of ERP guides the implementation process. It is also evident from the study findings that most New Zealand organizations select their consultants and let them guide the ERP selection, implementation as well as the post-implementation process.
Notes: Chapter 15 entitled, âA Study of the ERP Selection Process in New Zealandâ by Maha Shakir of Massey University (New Zealand) and Liaquat Hossain of Syracuse University (USA) provides an exploratory investigation of the ERP software selection process in New Zealand. The chapter gives a brief background describing the main features of ERP. The authors describe exploratory case studies on the ERP selection process and suggest that the selection of ERP guides the implementation process. The results further suggest that consultants play a large role in the selection process.
Maha Shakir, Liaquat Hossain (2002)  A Study of the ERP Selection Process in New Zealand   In: Enterprise Resource Planning: Global Opportunities and Challenges Edited by:Liaquat Hossain, Jon D Patrick, M A Rashid. 223-244 Idea Group Publishing  
Abstract: This study provides an exploratory investigation of the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software selection process in New Zealand. A brief background together with the main features of ERP is provided. It is conferred in this study that the selection and implementation of ERP deserves equal importance. Findings of exploratory case studies on the ERP selection process in New Zealand (NZ) suggest that the selection of ERP guides the implementation process. It is also evident from the study findings that most New Zealand organizations select their consultants and let them guide the ERP selection, implementation as well as the post-implementation process.
Notes: Addition to the ERP EndNote library

Conference papers

2009
Kathy Shen, Maha Shakir (2009)  Internet usage among Arab adolescents : Preliminary findings   In: European and Mediterranean Conference on Information Systems (EMCIS), Izmir, Turkey 1-10  
Abstract: Internet has profoundly transformed almost all aspects of our society. As a global phenomenon, Internet also bears distinct regional and cultural profiles. Much research has documented the Internet usage in Western world and its impacts on individuals. However evidence in this regards is dearth in Arab world, which represents an important but unique cultural region. In this study, we take an exploratory approach to examine the Internet usage patterns among young Arabic people, and the impact of Internet usage on their identity development. With surveys and structured interviews with 74 students from two universities in the UAE, one public and the other private, our results provide some preliminary results of the first generation of Arab youth exposed to the Internet. We found that Internet usage patterns were diverse however five main activities, searching, emailing, chatting, entertainment, and online discussions, form 75% of Internet usage time. Furthermore, a signification positive impact on self-perception of young Arabic students in the Middle East was observed.
Notes:
2008
Shahper Vodanovich, Cathy Urquhart, Maha Shakir (2008)  The Promise and Perils of ICTs in the UAE   In: Women as Global Leaders (WAGL) Conference, Dubai, UAE  
Abstract: Information Communications Technologies (ICTs) have become a potent force in transforming social, economic, and political life globally. As Avgerou & Walsham (2000) assert, ICTs have the potential to aid economic growth and the improvement of social conditions in the world. However, the transference of this vital knowledge to women in some Middle Eastern countries is hindered on two fronts. Embedded gender structures within society, as well as inadequate ICT infrastructure, training and support mean that women in these countries neither experience nor access ICTs in the same way. Some of the questions that this paper will endeavor to explore are: What are some of the promising new social, economic and political opportunities for women in the ICT sector of the U.A.E.? Does ICT use replicate patterns of gender segregation seen elsewhere in U.A.E. society? (What are the barriers that women in the Middle East, especially those in the U.A.E., have to overcome in order to actively participate in the promise of these technologies? This paper will explore the utilisation of technology as a tool for positive change and leadership opportunities for women in the U.A.E. This paper will consolidate the
Notes:
Maha Shakir, Kathy Shen, Shahper Vodanovich, Cathy Urquhart (2008)  Exploring women’s experience of IT in the UAE   In: European and Mediterranean Conference on Information Systems (EMCIS), Dubai, UAE 1-10  
Abstract: This study explores the ways UAE women are using, benefiting from, and are affected by information technology (IT). IT has an important role for individuals, businesses, and societies. However, a great deal of published research is focused on business. In this paper, our focus is on the less researched aspect which is female individuals and the society they live in. A survey of female nationals at a local university in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) was conducted to collect the primary data for the study. The results clearly show an agreement among respondents on the importance of IT to their education and future careers. Female perception of ITâs positive and negative effects for themselves and for their society is in agreement with comparable reports in the IT literature. Exceptions are perceptions of IT as a facilitator for increasing freedom, providing open and unrestricted access to information, and influencing thinking and beliefs. While such outcomes are often viewed positively in western cultures, respondents perceived these as negatives. This study sheds light on issues of IT and culture that are in urgent need of further understanding in the interconnected global environment we live in today.
Notes:
2007
Maha Shakir (2007)  e-Procurement for small-and-medium businesses : Challenges and opportunities   In: Business, Information and Management Academy (BIMA), Sharjah, UAE Edited by:Reza Barkhi, Kustim Wibowo.  
Abstract: Large organizations gain substantial benefits from implementing e-procurement initiatives however results are very much dependant on vendorsâ participation -- high participation means more benefits. However, vendor participation is often constrained by factors such as low IT maturity, high upfront expenses, fear of increasing competition, and unconvincing value proposition, particularly for the small-and-medium size (SME) vendors (Beck & Weitzel, 2005; Grandon & Pearson, 2004). In developing countries, challenges further include immature e-commerce regulations and limited telecommunications services. The objective of this paper is to explore e-procurement adoption challenges in the GCC region and suggest strategies that are applicable to local business operations. This is achieved through a review of the literature on e-procurement with a focus of SME adoption (Chong & Pervan, 2007; Parker & Swatman, 1995; Raymond & Bergeron, 1996; Thong, Yap, & Raman, 1996). Next, a case of a successful e-procurement adoption by the SME vendors of a big oil company in Oman is presented. Lessons are drawn from this case and recommendations on how to facilitate local e-procurement adoption by SME are discussed with implications for both academia and practice.
Notes:
Maha Shakir (2007)  ERP Trends : A Regional Perspective   In: Pre-ICIS Workshop on Enterprise Systems Research in MIS  
Abstract: This study highlights the key trends in the ERP market, with a focus on the challenges related to the implementation of these systems in the Middle Eastern Gulf region. The key trends discussed here include consolidation of the ERP market, diversification of the ERP product, new modes for ERP application delivery, ERP and new technologies, changing ERP pricing structures, ERP support operations, growing demands for ERP vertical solutions, demanding ERP clients, inter-organizational ERP solutions, and regional adaptations for ERP products. Awareness of these issues plus knowledge of the local environment gives us a richer understanding of key ERP issues and how they apply within the unique limitations and opportunities of this region.
Notes:
2006
Graham R Smith, Maha Shakir, Erkan Gulec (2006)  Vendor Enablement : Making e-Business Viable for the SME   In: SIMposium (SIM Annual Conference), Dallas, Texas  
Abstract: Vendor enablement, or the process by which buying organisations work with their Vendors to exchange business documents electronically, is a proven e-business initiative and is one of the first steps towards collaborative commerce. Well-structured Vendor enablement programmes yield dramatic reductions in transaction costs, fewer errors per transaction, and shorter cycle times for document processing.
Notes:
2005
2004
Maha Shakir, Dennis Viehland (2004)  Business Drivers in Contemporary Enterprise System Implementations   In: Americas Conference on Information Systems, New York, U.S.A. 103-112  
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine ES implementation business drivers in the new millennium and reflect on future directions for ES adoption. The study was designed to explore 'typical' implementations, where typical illustrates what is normal or average. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 key players in ES implementations, including ES vendors, ES consultants, IT research firms, and an ES hardware vendor. Two main issues, the implementation process and the organization, provide a framework to describe variations of typical ES implementations. Organization size, SME or large organizations, can be used to categorize two main types of ES implementations. Given that the ES market of large organizations is saturated, most ES implementations are in the SME category. The drivers behind SME implementations are: SMEs use core ES modules with minimum customization, ES vendors often manage implementation services, the number of users is around a hundred, and cost is below NZ$3 million.
Notes:
2001
2000
Maha Shakir (2000)  Decision Making in the Evaluation, Selection and Implementation of ERP Systems   In: Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS), Long Beach, California. 1033-1038  
Abstract: The evaluation, selection and implementation (ESI) of ERP systems involve making multiple decisions during the lifecycle of the ERP project. This study tries to map six models of decision-making to the ERP project lifecycle, which is conceptualized using case study data for a health service provider organization in New Zealand. ERP projects are deemed strategic projects for which success or failure has a great impact on the organization. Gaining an understanding of the decisionmaking process during the life of the project helps in better preparations and planning before and during each phase. Findings suggest that some decision-making models apply to the stages of evaluation, selection and implementation while others are missing. The three models that apply are the administrative, adaptive and political models. This study aids practitioners in better planning and implementation of ERP projects through better understanding the decision-making process. A benefit to academics is in providing new insights for ERP systems implementation, an area where little research is conducted.
Notes: Addition to the ERP EndNote library
1999

Technical reports

2003
Maha Shakir (2003)  Current issues of ERP implementations in New Zealand   1.  
Abstract: It is well known that most large Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) implementations have been completed by now, however the ERP market is still showing progressive growth after the slowdown of the late 1990s. The purpose of this study is to discuss the current status of ERP implementation in New Zealand (NZ). The study is designed to explore cases that can be described as âtypicalâ implementations, where a typical case is defined as one that illustrates what is normal or average. Specifically, the two main objectives of this study are to explore what is a typical case of ERP implementation in NZ, and to suggest pointers to describe current ERP implementation practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 key players of ERP implementations in NZ including ERP vendors, ERP consultants, IT research firms and an ERP hardware vendor. Research participants reported their interpretation of a typical case in terms of their particular experiences. The two main issues of the implementation process and the organization, which became evident in analyzing interview data, are used to describe variations of typical ERP implementations.
Notes:
2002
Maha Shakir (2002)  The Selection of Case Studies : Strategies and their Applications to IS implementation Cases Studies   1.  
Abstract: Case study research by definition is well suited to the study of IS implementation, especially when context is important. Furthermore, its products are highly relevant and therefore they appeal to IS practitioners, an audience for which the IS literature has been critiqued of ignoring. While the value of single case research is methodologically viable in the study of critical cases, the multiple case study approach is believed to be more appropriate to the study of typical cases of IS implementations. However, the IS literature provides little guidance on strategies for case study selection, particularly for multiple case studies. More important, is the need to provide the rational for case selection that relates these suggested strategies to the particular objectives of the case research inquiry. The purpose of this study is to fill this gap by providing a review of strategies for single and multiple case study selection in the context of systems implementation. Furthermore, the application of these guidelines in a multiple case study of strategic decision making of enterprise systems implementations will be illustrated.
Notes: Addition to the ERP EndNote library
2001
Maha Shakir (2001)  An ES Process Framework for Understanding the Strategic Decision Making Process of ES Implementations   1.  
Abstract: Enterprise systems (ES) implementations are regarded costly, time and resource consuming and have a great impact on the organization in terms of the risks they involve and the opportunities they provide. The steering committee (SC) represents the group of individuals who is responsible for making strategic decisions throughout the ES implementation lifecycle. It is evident from recent studies that there is a relationship between the decision making process and ES implementation success. One of the key elements that contribute to the success of ES implementations is a quick decision making process (Brown and Vessey, 1999; Gupta, 2000; Parr, et al., 1999). This study addresses the strategic decision-making process by SC through its focus on four research questions (1) How can the strategic decision-making process in the implementation of ES be better understood, during each phase of the ES implementation lifecycle? (2) What is the process by which the SC makes strategic decisions? (3) How are fast decisions made? and (4) How does decision speed link to the success of ES implementation? Process models of ES implementation will provide a framework to investigate the strategic decision making process during each phases of the ES implementation lifecycle. Patterns in the decision making process will be explored using strategic choice models. This study develops a research model that focuses on the decision making process by steering committee to explore research questions. It concludes with identifying contributions to both IS research and business practitioners.
Notes: Addition to the ERP EndNote library

Booklets

2007
Maha Shakir (2007)  Teaching Case Study: IT security assurance    
Abstract: In fall of 2006, Michael Small, President of IT Security Assurance, was evaluating how best to grow the business across borders. The company, based in London, Ontario, had grown from a small Y2K consultancy business to an IT security consultancy servicing major Canadian banks and the Canadian police. Over the last six years, the company had established a strong reputation that could easily be exploited in larger markets such as the US.
Notes:
2002
Maha Shakir (2002)  Current issues of ERP implementations in New Zealand   Institute of Information and Mathematical Sciences (IIMS), Massey University, Albany Campus  
Abstract: It is well known that most large Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) implementations have been completed by now, however the ERP market is still showing progressive growth after the slowdown of the late 1990s. The purpose of this study is to discuss the current status of ERP implementation in New Zealand (NZ). This is part of a larger study that investigates the strategic decision-making (SDM) process of ERP implementation in NZ as part of a multiple case study research design. The findings of this working paper will enable both the exploration and selection of case studies that reflect current ERP implementation practice. Therefore, the study is designed to explore cases that can be described as âtypicalâ implementations, where a typical case is defined as one that illustrates what is normal or average. Specifically, the two main objectives of this study are to explore what is a typical case of ERP implementation in NZ, and to suggest pointers to describe current ERP implementation practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 key players of ERP implementations in NZ including ERP vendors, ERP consultants, IT research firms and an ERP hardware vendor. Research participants reported their interpretation of a typical case in terms of their particular experiences. The two main issues of the implementation process and the organization, which became evident in analyzing interview data, are used to describe variations of typical ERP implementations. A typical case of ERP implementation can be described in terms of the four ERP implementations models, which are the âvendorâ vs. â3rd partyâ implementer, the âheavy customizationâ vs. âout-of-the-boxâ implementations, the ânewâ, âupgradesâ and/ or âreplaceâ implementations and the âtraditionalâ vs. âbest-of-breedâ implementations. Other factors that complement our understanding of the implementation process include phases, modules, time-to-implement, locations, cost, number of users and project structure. Furthermore, organizational issues pertinent to ERP implementation include organization size, IS lifecycle maturity, organization ownership, organization profit-making status and organizational global and national reach. A synthesis of these detailed sub-categories to reflect on current ERP implementation practice will be provided in relating organizational size to implementation process pointers for both SMEs and large organizations.
Notes:

Other

2006
Graham R Smith, Maha Shakir, Erkan Gulec (2006)  E-Procurement through supply chain integration : reaching out to SMBs   Society for Information Management (SIM): SIM Paper Awards Competition - 1st Award  
Abstract: The use of information technology in the integration of business processes has made substantial improvements in both the efficiency and effectiveness of organizations. Yet, many integration attempts continue to stop at the boundary of the organization. One main inhibitor to the electronic extension of the supply chain lies in the incompatibility of business setup between the large organization and the majority of its business partners. xD; xD;While the big business enjoys the sophisticated IT infrastructure that supports many kinds of information integration, manipulation, and reporting, the small to medium business (SMB) partner is using IT only for simple clerical tasks. Until the big business finds a way to extend IT integration capabilities to the majority of its supply chain partners, the huge investments made in internal integration capabilities are not fully realized. xD; xD;This case examines how a large exploration and production company in the Oil and Gas industry, namely Petroleum Development Oman (PDO), managed to electronically integrate its complete supply chain -- including its full vendor base -- through e-procurement. We show how the company astutely outsourced both the delivery of the e-procurement solution and the management of the vendor relationship process to a third party. By doing this, the company avoided huge upfront investment and created the capability to support vendors from day one. This experience has significant implications for industry practitioners, highlighting how it is possible for the relatively IT immature SMB type of businesses to successfully adopt e-procurement in a reasonably short period of time. Lessons are drawn to show how big businesses can achieve successful adoption of e-commerce solutions in an environment where both the telecommunications and regulations supporting electronic trading are still developing.
Notes:

PhD theses

2004
Maha Shakir (2004)  A process approach for understanding strategic enterprise system implementation decisions    
Abstract: Enterprise system (ES) implementation involves large investment of resources for a long period of time before business benefits can be realized, meaning the choice of system is one of the most critical decisions an organization makes. However, a right choice does not guarantee a successful working system because ES implementation is a complex and a dynamic process that involves a mix of technological and organizational decisions. These decisions cannot be structured and need to be revised and reformulated with the pace of implementation. As a result, the understanding of these decisions cannot be separated from the understanding of the implementation process. A review of the IS literature suggests that the dominant stream of strategic decision-making (SDM) research follows a strategy formulation approach, while research into implementation of strategic IT decisions receives little attention. To fill this gap, this study takes the latter approach both to understand 15 key ES implementation decisions, and to establish a model for facilitating ES implementation that has both a theoretical and a practical significance. Using the multiple theoretical perspectives of SDM models and through two case studies of ES implementation, qualitative data on the SDM process pertaining to the 15 decisions was gathered to inductively develop a model of the ES implementation process as it unfolded over time. The SDM model reveals ES implementation as a four-phase process: (1) preparation, (2) design, (3) configuration, and (4) realization. For each phase of the model, key activities pertaining to the decision process for these 15 decisions that enabled implementation to move forward are described.
Notes: Enterprise system (ES), enterprise resource planning (ERP), strategic decision-making (SDM), decisions models, process approach, case studies

Masters theses

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